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‘Being a patient at the Trinity Private Practice gives you a true appreciation of what individual and personal care is all about.’

 

Why Choose Us

  • First Class Medical Care
  • Availability 24 hour a day /
    7 Days a week by Appointment
  • Same Day Appointments
  • No pre-registration required
  • Prompt Access to tests and diagnostic imaging
  • Unrivalled relationship with leading specialists
  • Continuity of Care
  • Patient – Centred, Solution Focused Approach

Appointments

  • Flexible Appointments
  • 6am to 8pm
  • Saturday & Sunday
    Appointments
  • Out of Hours Appointments
  • Home Visits

The Trinity Private Practice

Cancer Screening

Cancer screening exams are medical tests done when you’re healthy, and you don’t have any signs of illness. They help find cancer early, when the chances for successfully treating the disease are greatest. 

The exams you get and how often you’re tested depends on your chances of getting cancer.

We can provide guidance on what screening may be appropriate and then undertake the necessary investigations.

We recommend screening exams for these cancers

  1. Breast Cancer Screening Exams
  2. Cervical Cancer Screening Exams
  3. Colorectal Cancer Screening Exams
  4. Endometrial Cancer Screening Exams
  5. Liver Cancer Screening Exams
  6. Lung Cancer Screening Exams
  7. Ovarian Cancer Screening Exams
  8. Prostate Cancer Screening Exams
  9. Skin Cancer Screening Exams

Breast Cancer Screening Exams

Breast cancer screening exams help find breast cancer at an early stage. When found early, the chances for successfully treating the disease are greatest.

Along with regular exams, practice awareness. This means you should stay familiar with your breasts. That way you’ll notice changes, like a new lump or mass. Then, report them to your doctor without delay.

The screening recommendations below apply to most women.

Age 20 to 39

  • Clinical breast exam every 1 to 3 years (A health care provider checks for lumps or other changes.)

Age 40 to 75

  • Clinical breast exam every year
  • Mammogram every year

Exams for women at increased risk

Women at increased risk have a higher chance of getting breast cancer.

This doesn’t mean you will definitely get cancer. But, you may need to start screening at an earlier age, get additional tests or be tested more often.

You’re at increased risk for breast cancer if you fall under one or more of these groups.

  • History of radiation treatment to the chest
  • Genetic mutation, including an abnormality in the BRCA 1 or BRCA 2 genes, CDH1, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba Syndrome
  • History of lobular carcinoma in situ
  • Five-year risk of breast cancer 1.7% or greater at age 35 or older, as defined by a Gail Model calculation. Calculate your risk using the Gail Model.
  • A life-time risk of breast cancer 20% or greater, as defined by models dependent on family history. Women with a strong family history of breast cancer should consider speaking with a genetic counsellor.

Cervical Cancer Screening Exams

Cervical cancer screening exams help find cervical cancer at an early stage. When found early, the chances for successfully treating the disease are greatest.

Along with regular exams, practice awareness. This means you should be familiar with your body. That way you’ll notice changes, like irregular bleeding or discharge. Then, report them to your doctor without delay.

Make sure you get a well-woman check-up every year even if you don’t need a screening exam. If you’ve had the HPV vaccine, you still need to be screened.

The screening recommendations below apply to most women.

Age 21 to 29

  • Cervical smear test every three years

Age 30 to 64

  • Cervical smear test every three years

Age 65 or older

You may not need additional exams if you’ve had no unusual smear or HPV test results in the past 10 years. Discuss this with your doctor.

Exams for women who have had a hysterectomy

If you’ve have had a hysterectomy, but have not had cervical cancer or severe cervical dysplasia, you should:

  • Speak with your doctor about whether you should continue screening if your hysterectomy included removal of the cervix.
  • Get a cervical smear test and HPV test every five years if your hysterectomy didn’t include removal of the cervix.

Exams for women at increased risk

Women at increased risk have a higher chance of getting cervical cancer.

This doesn’t mean you’ll definitely get cancer. But, you may need to start screening at an earlier age, get additional tests or be tested more often.

You’re at increased risk for cervical cancer if you fall under one or more of these groups.

  • History of severe cervical dysplasia, which is a pre-cancerous condition
  • Persistent HPV infection after age 30
  • An immune system that doesn’t function properly, such as organ transplant recipients and those taking medications to suppress their immune system
  • History of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

Colorectal Cancer Screening Exams

Cancer screening exams for colon cancer and rectal cancer find cancer at an early stage. When found early, the chances for successfully treating the disease are greatest.

Along with regular exams, practice awareness. This means you should be familiar with your body. That way you’ll notice changes, like bleeding or unusual bowel movements. Then, report them to your doctor without delay.

The screening recommendations below apply to most adults.

Age 50 or older

Follow ONE of the screening options below:

  • Colonoscopy every 10 years.
  • Virtual colonoscopy (also called Computed Tomographic Colonography) every five years. A colonoscopy will be performed if polyps are found.
  • Fecal Occult Blood Test (FOBT) every year. This take-home test finds hidden blood in the stool. This may be a sign of cancer. The FOBT may not prevent colorectal cancer. If your doctor finds blood in your stool, you will need a colonoscopy to find out the cause.

The colonoscopy and virtual colonoscopy can find abnormal colon polyps before they turn into cancer.

Your doctor can help you decide if you should continue screening after age 75. We don’t recommend screening for adults after age 85.

Exams for adults at increased or high risk

Adults at increased or high risk are more likely to get colorectal cancer.

This doesn’t mean you’ll definitely get cancer. But, you may need to start screening at an earlier age, get additional tests or be tested more often.

You’re at increased or high risk if you fall under one or more of these groups:

  • Personal history of precancerous colon polyps (adenomas)
  • Family history of colorectal cancer or precancerous polyps (adenomas). In other words, a family member had or has colorectal cancer or precancerous polyps.
  • Personal history of Familial Adenomatous Polyposis or suspected Familial Adenomatous Polyposis without yet having undergone genetic testing
  • Personal history of Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer or family history of Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer
  • Inflammatory bowel disease (chronic ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease)

Endometrial Cancer Screening Exams

At this time, endometrial cancer (uterine cancer) screening is recommended only for women at increased risk. That’s because they have a higher chance of getting the disease.

Being at increased risk doesn’t mean you’ll definitely get endometrial cancer. But, you may need to start regular screening exams. So if you do get cancer, your doctor finds it at its earliest stage. When found early, the chances for successfully treating the disease are greatest.

Along with regular exams, practice awareness. This means you should be familiar with your body. That way you’ll notice changes like irregular bleeding or discharge. Then, report them to your doctor without delay.

You’re at increased risk if you’ve been diagnosed with or have a family history of Lynch Syndrome (Hereditary Non-polyposis Colorectal Cancer). If so, you should follow the screening schedule below.

  • Transvaginal ultrasound every year
  • Endometrial biopsy every year

Liver Cancer Screening Exams

At this time, liver cancer screening is recommended only for adults at increased risk. That’s because they have a higher chance of getting the disease.

Being at increased risk doesn’t mean you’ll definitely get liver cancer. But, you may need to start regular screening exams. So if you do get cancer, your doctor finds it at its earliest stage. When found early, the chances for successfully treating the disease are greatest.

Along with regular exams, practice awareness. This means you should be familiar with your body. That way you’ll notice changes, like jaundice or weight loss. Then, report them to your doctor without delay.

Conditions that increase your risk

You’re at increased risk if you have chronic hepatitis B infection or cirrhosis of the liver. Below are medical conditions that may eventually increase your risks for cirrhosis of the liver.

  • Chronic hepatitis C infection
  • Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC)
  • Inherited metabolic disease, including:
    • Hemochromatosis
    • Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency
    • Glycogen storage disease
    • Prophyria cutanea tarda
    • Tryosinemia
  • Autoimmune hepatitis
  • Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)

If you have any of these conditions, speak with your doctor. He or she can decide if you need certain exams to evaluate your liver cancer risks.

Exams for adults at increased risk

Age 21 to 75

  • Liver ultrasound every 6 months
  • Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) blood test every 6 months

Lung Cancer Screening Exams

At this time, lung cancer screening is recommended only for adults at high risk. That’s because they have a higher chance of getting the disease.

Being at high risk doesn’t mean you’ll definitely get lung cancer. But, you may need to start regular screening exams. So if you do get cancer, your doctor finds it at its earliest stage. When found early, the chances for successfully treating the disease are greatest.

You should get screened for lung cancer if you:

  • Are a current smoker (or former smoker who quit in the past 15 years)
  • Have a 30 pack- year smoking habit (For example, one pack a day for 30 years or two packs a day for 15 years).

If you fall into this group, follow the screening schedule below:

Age 55 to 74

  • Low-dose computerized tomography (CT or CAT scan) every year

Ovarian Cancer Screening Exams

At this time, ovarian cancer screening is recommended only for women at increased or high risk. That’s because they have a higher chance of getting the disease.

Being at increased risk doesn’t mean you’ll definitely get ovarian cancer. But, you may need to start regular screening exams. So if you do get cancer, your doctor finds it at its earliest stage. When found early, the chances for successfully treating the disease are greatest.

Along with regular exams, practice awareness. This means you should be familiar with your body. That way you’ll notice changes like abdominal discomfort , pain or bloating. Then, report them to your doctor without delay.

You should get screened for ovarian cancer if you have ONE of the following: 

  • BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations
  • Suspected risk of BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations
  • One close relative with ovarian cancer who has a suspected BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation
  • Lynch Syndrome (Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer)

If you fall into any of these groups, ask your doctor when to start the screening schedule below:

  • Transvaginal ultrasound every 6-12 months
  • CA 125 blood test every 6-12 months

If you have BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, you should get these exams every 6 months.

Talk to your doctor about risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy, or surgery to remove your Fallopian tubes and ovaries. This surgery is strongly recommended for women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations after they’ve had children.

Prostate Cancer Screening Exams

Prostate cancer screening exams help find prostate cancer at its earliest stage. When found early, the chances for successfully treating the disease are greatest.

Along with regular exams, practice awareness. This means you should be familiar with your body. That way you’ll notice changes like irregular urination. Then, report them to your doctor without delay.

The screening recommendations below apply to most men.

Age 50 to 75

  • Discuss screening risks and benefits with our doctor
  • Digital rectal exam every year, if you choose to be screened
  • Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test every year, if you choose to be screened

Age 76 or older

  • Your doctor can help you decide if you still need prostate screening
  • We don’t recommend cancer screening for men age 85 or older

Exams for men at increased risk

Men at increased risk are more likely to get prostate cancer. This doesn’t mean you’ll definitely get cancer. But, you may need to start screening at an earlier age, get additional tests or be tested more often.

You’re at increased risk if you fall under one or more of these groups:

  • Family history (especially father, brother, son) of prostate cancer Follow the screening schedule below if you’re at increased risk:

Age 40 to 75

  • Discuss screening risks and benefits with our doctor
  • Digital rectal exam every year starting age 45, if you choose to be screened
  • Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test every year starting at age 45, if you choose to be screened

Skin Cancer Screening Exams

At this time, skin cancer screening is recommended only for adults at increased risk. That’s because they have a higher chance of getting the disease.

Being at increased risk doesn’t mean you’ll definitely get skin cancer. But, you may need to start regular screening exams. So if you do get cancer, your doctor finds it at its earliest stage. When found early, the chances for successfully treating the disease are greatest.

Along with regular exams, practice awareness. This means you should be familiar with your skin. That way you’ll notice changes, then report them to your doctor without delay.

Promptly show your doctor any:

  • Suspicious skin area
  • Sore that doesn’t heal
  • Change in a mole or freckle

Get a full-body skin cancer screening exam every year if you identify with one or more of the groups below:

Inherited risks

  • Red hair and freckles albinism
  • More than 50 moles
  • Family history of melanoma
  • Genetic syndromes that make you sensitive to the sun

Environmental exposures

  • Too much sun exposure
  • Frequent trips to the tanning salon
  • One or more blistering sunburn(s)

Personal pre-cancerous conditions

  • Actinic keratosis
  • Dysplastic nevi (unusual moles)

Personal skin cancer history

  • Basal and squamous cell cancer

Prior treatment

  • Radiation treatment
  • Immuosuppressive treatment
  • Other cancer treatments that increase risk